Troiku – Basho’s Final Haiku

 

旅に病で
夢は枯野を
かけ廻る

falling sick on a journey
my dream goes wandering
over a field of dried grass

falling sick on a journey
summer has lasted too long
the sun hides in rain

my dream goes wandering
cranes are heading southward
passing the ones who stay

over a field of dried grass
a sudden wind from a storm
whistling my farewell song

* * *

Back in 2012 (or 13?) Chèvrefeuille, the host of Carpe Diem Haiku Kai, introduced the form he called, Troiku.  Follow the link for more information on this form.  It’s an interesting twist on an ancient and revered poetry form.  It’s also a lot of fun!  The first haiku is the last one the master, Matsuo Bashō, wrote before he died.

 

 

Haiku – Short Story

 

“Nearly everything we are taught is false except how to read.”

– Jim Harrison

 

 

cloud   writing   at   night
rainy   season   hiatus
only   a   fiction

 

 

* * *

 

Shifting gears for day 11 of Jilly’s “28 Days of Unreason” challenge.  I wrote two other poems for this prompt — didn’t like either one.  Not really.  So what do I do with rejects?  Let them lie like a sleeping alligator (“Do not feed or harass…”  Think about how stupid someone has to be to feed an alligator… that’s like feeding a kitten; now they’re going to follow you home… or harass an alligator… isn’t that like harassing a heavy weight boxer or something?).  If I’ve managed to spread any gold dust in those rejects, I’ll grab my pan and take them to the river… or some other mining thing like that.

Yeah, I’m a writer!

American Haiku – Winter Solstice

Sun hides inside cave —
America’s winter comes
we hold on for Spring

Posted to Frank J. Tassone’s American Haijin Haiku Challenge #12.  The challenge word(s) are “Winter Solstice.”  I thank Frank for posting this on his blog, allowing us to be unconventional at times with our approach to what would normally be traditional Japanese forms… except very few of us speak Japanese… and even if we did, we’d bugger up the forms, because they are a part of the Japanese culture.  I’m thankful that our Japanese brothers and sisters suffer us in our ignorance and conceit!