Beyond a Shadow

shadow-of-a-doubt

“Shadow of a Doubt,” directed by Alfred Hitchcock

 

It was then when I first saw
your doubt… he was lurking
just around the corner from
the garage.  True, in some way
I, too, brought a doubt along.

How could you doubt, I thought;
but then there he was, dressed
in coldly dubious business casual.

Why stand on formalities
when belief is strained –
like a can of beans?

They didn’t take long to become
acquainted, your doubt and mine.

They shared the time of day,
the weather, and eventually
pictures of the wives and pets
as they rummaged through
the ice box, helping themselves
to your beer.  They took over
the couch and love seat, spilling
ripple chips across the cushions.

Soon they were immersed in some
show they both binged on, using
your Netflix account.  They got
to be absolute nuisances, those
two.

We worked together – the first
time in a long time.  We mustered
all the faith we could.  Eventually
they were out of your house, out
of our hair.

It took us all day to remove all doubt.

 

 

 

 

35 thoughts on “Beyond a Shadow

  1. This is a complete package post, Charley. That image is perfect for what you have written. Love the personification of your doubt / my doubt – they are rascals, indeed. Really enjoy “when belief is strained –
    like a can of beans?” Excellent writing!

    Like

    • Thank you, Björn. I don’t know why, but these two just popped to life, much like Things 1 & 2 in Cat in the Hat. The Netflix was the only thing I could think of that deserves being abused.

      Like

  2. That’s great. Your poem tells a story that others would write novels about. I love the image of the two doubts sitting on the couch watching Netflix. I’m glad you got them to move on by the end of the day.

    Like

  3. I love your description of doubt and doubt. This reminded me of the TV commercial about stomach bloating where the thing crawls in bed along side of her till she takes her medicine. Good job Charley.

    Like

  4. I love how you’ve taken the saying as a springboard and then told a whole story based on the personification of doubt, Charley, and, like a Hitchcock film, it has a sinister tone! Brilliant lines:
    ‘Why stand on formalities
    when belief is strained –
    like a can of beans?’
    and
    ‘They shared the time of day,
    the weather, and eventually
    pictures of the wives and pets
    as they rummaged through
    the ice box, helping themselves
    to your beer’.

    Like

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